Totally “Baked” Danny Boy Cupcake!

You all might have heard about a popular drink served particularly around St. Patty’s Day call the Irish Car Bomb.  You make one by adding Bailey’s and Jameson to a shot glass.  You layer the Bailey’s on the bottom.  After you pour the Guinness into a pint glass or beer mug 3/4 of the way full you simply drop the shot glass into the Guinness and chug.  This drink sounds like it can get you totally “BAKED”.

I love the idea of making this drink into a cake/cupcake, but I thoroughly dislike the name.  One of our faithful facebook followers suggested that we rename it the Buzzed Danny Boy which we think is an awesome name, but since we always try to play off of our “BAKED” name we have decided to rename this concoction the Totally “BAKED” Danny Boy.

We’re lucky to have a fantastic micro-brewry right here in town so I strolled on over to Burley Oak Brewery and grabbed myself a growler of their Black Cow Stout.  Now, I’ve made Chocolate Stout Cupcakes with Burley Oak brew before, but adding this Black Cow to my recipe really cranked things up a notch.  The cupcake was so moist and balanced it was delicious without the accouterments of filling or frosting, but in our efforts to recreate the drink in a cake/cupcake form we’ve filled them with Irish Whiskey Ganache and topped them with our homemade Irish Cream Liquor buttercream.  The Totally “Baked” Danny Boy cupcakes are rolling out the door for a limited time only.

For your baking enjoyment I’m including the following recipe for Chocolate Stout Cupcakes.  It’s the best that I’ve found and is courtesy of David Lieberman of the Food Network.

  • 3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 cups all-purposeflour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • Pinch fine salt
  • 1 bottle stout beer (I recommend Burley Oak’s Black Cow)
  • 1 stick butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 3 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup sour cream

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the cocoa, sugar, flour, baking soda, and salt.

In another medium mixing bowl, combine the stout, melted butter, and vanilla. Beat in eggs, 1 at time. Mix in sour cream until thoroughly combined and smooth. Gradually mix the dry ingredients into the wet mixture.

Lightly grease 24 muffin tins. Divide the batter equally between muffin tins, filling each 3/4 full. Bake for about 12 minutes and then rotate the pans. Bake another 12 to 13 minutes until risen, nicely domed, and set in the middle but still soft and tender. Cool before turning out.

My suggestion…You can top these cupcake with any of your favorite fillings and/or buttercream frostings, but honestly they’re absolutely delicious all by themselves.Totally "BAKED" Danny Boy Cupcake

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Recycled Red Velvet Cake…Delicious!

Red Velvet Truffle Bomb

At Baked Dessert Cafe, we bake all natural, buy locally when possible, compost our kitchen waste and of course recycle all of our boxes, plastic, glass and cans, but what about recycling cake?  This idea is not so far fetched, people recycle left over food all of the time!  One night you might have a roast with vegetables, two days later it becomes vegetable beef soup, stale bread can be morphed into croutons or bread pudding.  You see where I’m going with this?

For those of you who bake, you know first hand that there are great baking days and days where something just doesn’t go quite right.  Sometimes this can be explained, other times it’s a great mystery. We recently had one of those days when we were baking our all natural Red Velvet Cupcakes.  The oven was loaded and everything seemed right with the world until the end of the baking cycle.  For some reason the cupcakes didn’t rise to our expectations.  They tasted delicious as usual, they just didn’t look pretty.  We’re not talking about a few cupcakes here, we’re talking about several dozen cupcakes.    What a waste it would be to just discard them just because they weren’t perfect. What to do, what to do?

Why not recycle the cupcakes into another dessert I thought?  My creative wheels began turning and then spinning wildly out of control.  I landed on the idea of the cupcake pop.  I have made cupcake pops before, but didn’t have any lollipop stick for this project and then it hit me.  I would create the “Red Velvet Truffle Bomb”.  I started by pulverizing the cake in the food processor and adding enough cream cheese buttercream frosting to form a dough, similar to the consistency of a cookie dough.  I then scooped generous portions and rolled them into balls, placing them in pretty  cupcake cups.  When making cupcake pops you generally dip them into melted chocolate, but these were pretty big, so I decided instead to smother them with chocolate ganache and top them with a dollop of cream cheese buttercream and our all natural red sugar sprinkles.

Of course these needed to be taste tested.  Shelly and I thought they were fabulous, but our customer’s opinion is most important.   Several lucky patrons were given the concoction and their honest opinions solicited.  Once we had their “lip smacking” seal of approval, the “Red Velvet Truffle Bomb” became our weekly dessert special and I’m proud to add a “sell out”.  What was thought initially to be a disaster turned out to be a great success!

So, the next time you have an “off ” baking day, don’t pitch the end product if it isn’t perfect.  Think about how you can recycle it into a new and delicious creation!  Get creative and remember to get “BAKED” at the beach!

Pinch me…I’m not Irish, but I love Soda Bread!

Soda breads are a variety of quick bread and are appropriately named since “bread soda”, otherwise known as baking soda, is used as a raising agent rather than yeast.   The ingredients of traditional soda bread are flourbread sodasalt, and buttermilk.  Although, you can get really creative  here and include raisins, seeds, nuts, savory herbs, even oats.  The buttermilk in the dough contains lactic acid, which reacts with the baking soda to form tiny bubbles of carbon dioxide. * I have seen some recipes that replace the buttermilk with live yogurt or even stout.  I wanted to go the traditional route and didn’t have buttermilk on hand, so I made my own by simply adding 1 tablespoon of white vinegar or you can use lemon juice per one cup of milk.

You can form the bread loaf into the “traditional” round or flatten it and cook it on a griddle for the “griddle cake” form. Whichever shape your Irish Soda Bread takes it is important to resist the urge to over knead this dough.  Only work it long enough to incorporate the ingredients.  This brings me to the best thing about soda breads and is one of the reasons that they began to appear in the mid-19th century in Europe.  Soda breads are easy and inexpensive to make and they are delicious!  Of course the beginning of the 19th century was also when bicarbonate of soda first became available for use.

There are several stories about the significance of the cross made in the middle of the Irish Soda Bread loaf.  Some say that it is the “sign of the cross” and wards off evil spirits.  Others, that the cut in the top of this loaf assists the cooking process by allowing air circulation which in turn helps the loaf rise better.  Most admit that the  cut is an easy guideline for serving even slices.  What I am certain of is that this bread won’t last long on the dinner table.  It’s fabulous, particularly served warm slathered in butter.

The following recipe makes 2 loafs

7 cups unbleached, unbromated flour

2 teaspoons baking soda

1-1/2 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon sugar (optional)

3 cups buttermilk

Sift to combine the flour, baking soda, salt and sugar in a large bowl.  Making a well in the center, add the buttermilk and stir to form dough.  Turn out onto a floured surface and gently knead just enough to incorporate the ingredients. Form into a log and divide in half to form 2 round loafs.  Place on baking sheet lined with parchment paper, cut a 1″ deep cross into the top of each loaf and bake for 45 minutes in a 375 degree oven or until a knife inserted in center comes out clean.  Enjoy!

Beer in Orange Curd…Yum!

Ok, so you know that we have been experimenting with BEER in our recipes to include in our St. Patty’s day dessert menu.  A “wino” myself, I was uncertain of the outcome including this beverage in things such as cupcakes, caramel and curds, but WOW was I surprised at the outcome!

We assumed that mixing beer with chocolate and in caramel might be a good match, but the recipe that  follows is one for “Orange Beer Curd”.  It was the most surprising!  You just get a hint of the pale ale which when combined with the fresh orange juice is absolutely amazing.  We intend to fill our Madagasgar Bourbon Vanilla cupcakes with it and top them with fresh orange buttercream.  This brings new meaning to getting “BAKED” at the beach.

Orange Beer Filling

  • 1/2 C Capital Special Pilsner
  • 1 1/2 T cornstarch
  • 1/8 t salt
  • 1/3 C sugar
  • 2 t grated orange peel
  • 1/3 C orange juice
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 t butter

In the top of a double boiler, combine sugar, cornstarch and salt. Stir in beer and orange juice. Cook over direct heat, stirring constantly, until thickened and clear. Add a little hot mixture to the egg yolk, return to double boiler top. Cook over hot water, stirring constantly, for 4-5 minutes. Stir in peel and butter. Cool before spreading on cake. Makes about 1 cup, enough to fill an 8- or 9-inch 2-layer cake.